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Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

4 edition of Japan, the fragile superpower found in the catalog.

Japan, the fragile superpower

Frank Gibney

Japan, the fragile superpower

by Frank Gibney

  • 217 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Norton in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Japan
    • Subjects:
    • National characteristics, Japanese.,
    • Japan -- Civilization.,
    • Japan -- History -- 1945-

    • Edition Notes

      Includes index.

      Statementby Frank Gibney.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS821 .G513 1979
      The Physical Object
      Pagination378 p. ;
      Number of Pages378
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4735291M
      ISBN 100393057046
      LC Control Number78024607
      OCLC/WorldCa4496951

      China remains, however, a very fragile superpower. Follow up: China is clearly trying to assert itself as the great power of East Asia, and is challenging the position of the US and its allies. China remains, however, a very fragile superpower, some seven years after Susan Shirk published a book of the same title, just before the Lehman shock. Shirk argues insightfully that China's leaders display a pattern of political insecurity and that China's internal politics could derail its peaceful rise.

      You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.   The best (not suggesting it's perfect) way I can think of is to define China as a rising global power with great ambitions, but fragile in many ways. A rising global power is .

        Books like Susan Shirk’s China: Fragile Superpower are important antidotes to the Scary China Syndrome. Written, like China Wars, to be read in bite-sized pieces and also loaded up with facts and figures, Fragile Superpower instead portrays a China both strong and weak, preoccupied with its own domestic issues but eager to play a role as a Author: Kate Merkel-Hess. Writer Frank Gibney used the term fragile superpower in a book to describe the problems in an ascendant Japan. I think that term fits China far better. This photo-essay is my snapshot of a fascinating giant that ’s simultaneously domineering and weak, powerful yet insecure.


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Japan, the fragile superpower by Frank Gibney Download PDF EPUB FB2

Japan: The Fragile Superpower sets out to answer these intriguing questions and at the same time provides a penetrating analysis of the inner dynamics of Japanese business, politics, and culture. The first edition of Frank Gibney's widely acclaimed book was long required/5(10).

Japan: The Fragile Superpower sets out to answer these intriguing questions and at the same time provides a penetrating analysis of the inner dynamics of Japan business, politics, and culture.

The first edition of Frank Gibney's widely acclaimed book was long required reading for anyone interested in modern by: China: Fragile Superpower should change our assessment of China's leadership, which is a lot less stable than many of us thought."- Washington Post Book World "In her extremely convincing book, she shows that there is another emotional side which, driven by unresolved internal tensions, could still push China into a military confrontation."--Cited by: Japan: The Fragile Superpower.

by Frank Gibney. Norton. $ Many more people should read this book than will. Gibney has set out to tell us everything about the modern Japanese, and to a very considerable degree he has succeeded. He assembles his compendium, moreover, with a light grace that makes it seem not at all compendious.

Japan: The Fragile Superpower sets out to answer these intriguing questions and at the same time provides a the fragile superpower book analysis of the inner dynamics of Japanese business, politics, and culture." "The first edition of Frank Gibney's widely acclaimed book was long required reading for anyone interested in modern Japan.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Fragile is the right word describing China as a rising superpower in this book. The author, a former diplomat specializing in China, elaborated succinctly why 'fragile' is the right word when it comes to China's internal politics/5. Once a sleeping giant, China today is the world's fastest growing economy--the leading manufacturer of cell phones, laptop computers, and digital cameras--a dramatic turn-around that alarms many Westerners.

But in China: Fragile Superpower, Susan L. Shirk opens up the black box of Chinese politics and finds that the real danger lies elsewhere--not in China's. The Paperback of the Japan, Fragile Superpower by Frank B. Gibney at Barnes & Noble. FREE Shipping on $35 or more.

B&N Outlet Membership Educators Gift Author: Frank B. Gibney. Japan: The Fragile Superpower sets out to answer these intriguing questions and at the same time provides a penetrating analysis of the inner dynamics of Japanese business, politics, and culture.

The first edition of Frank Gibney's widely acclaimed book was long required reading for anyone interested in modern Japan. In this revealing book, readers see the world through the eyes of men like President Hu Jintao and former President Jiang Zemin.

We discover a fragile communist regime desperate to survive in a society turned upside down by miraculous economic /5(3). China: Fragile Superpower - Ebook written by Susan L.

Shirk. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read China: Fragile Superpower.5/5(2). But in China: Fragile Superpower, Susan L. Shirk opens up the black box of Chinese politics and finds that the real danger lies elsewhere-not in China’s astonishing growth, but in the deep insecurity of its leaders.

China’s leaders face a troubling paradox: the. In her new book, China: Fragile Superpower, Shirk, a professor at University of California, San Diego's Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, offers an in-depth analysis of the major forces that drive Chinese politics.

Her argument is that China's political leaders feel insecure and threatened, and that because of the. Author: FRANK GIBNEY Title: Japan Fragile Superpower (Meridian) Binding: Paper Back Book Condition: New Publisher: Plume ISBN Number: / Seller ID: Price = USD. " Japan Fragile Superpower by Frank Gibney A copy that has been read, but remains in clean condition.

All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. All pages are intact, and the cover is intact. The spine may show signs of wear. Frank Bray Gibney (Septem – April 9, ) was an American journalist, editor, writer and scholar.

He learned Japanese while in the American Navy during World War II, then was stationed in Japan. As a journalist in Tokyo, he wrote Five Gentlemen of Japan, a popular book about the Japanese, welcomed for its humanism and for transcending the bitterness of war.

A potential superpower is a state or a political and economic entity that is speculated to be—or to have the potential to soon become—a superpower. Currently, only the United States fulfills the criteria to be considered a superpower. China on the other hand, has been referred to as an emerging superpower, given that Beijing's power is now beyond the classification of a Great.

CHINA'S FRAGILE SUPERPOWER. AUTHOR: Susan Shirk. RATING: 10 of Select Highlights. In-depth analysis of the domestic pressures Chinese policymakers must juggle while acting on the global stage.

Frank Gibney, in the s, had written a seminal book on Japan and called it "The Fragile Superpower." In a new appraisal, Gibney has written that Japan became the.

|a Strong abroad but fragile at home -- China's economic miracle -- Domestic threats -- The echo chamber of nationalism: media and the Internet -- The responsible power -- Japan: "when the Chinese people get angry, the result is always big trouble" -- Taiwan: "a question of regime survival" -- The United States: "external troubles can.A review of the book "China: Fragile Superpower," by Susan L.

Shirk is presented. Friedman, Edward // China Review International;Fall, Vol. 14 Issue 2, p The article reviews the book "China: Fragile Superpower," by Susan L. Shirk.Gibney is a veteran Japan-watcher (Five Gentlemen of Japan, ; Japan: The Fragile Superpower, rev. ) who's earned the right to be unoriginal--to contrast the Japanese ""long-term investment in people"" with our ""perpetual hiring and firing,"" their flexible consultations with our hard-and-fast contracts, etc., etc.